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2011年05月28日

Local cuisine of the Tohoku region

Sasakamaboko (Miyagi Prefecture)

Kamaboko (steamed fish paste) is made by grinding up the white meat of fish, kneading it with salt, mirin (sweet cooking rice wine), sugar and starch and then steaming or roasting. Sasakamaboko, however, is named after its bamboo (sasa) leaf shape, and the marks left from toasting. A specialty of Miyagi, it is a popular gift or souvenir. The most famous sasakamaboko is from Sendai, where rows of shops have prepared their home-made style for years. It is also produced in Shiogama, Ishinomaki, Kesennuma, Watari and Onagawa. Some say that it originates from minced fish made into paste by hand and grilled in order to preserve the seasonal catch of flounder.
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タグ:Japanese food
posted by jsato at 07:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2011年05月20日

Soy sauce / History & etc. / Japanese Cuisine

http://viviangrant.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/soy-sauce-sq-bowl.jpg

http://images.businessweek.com/ss/06/05/phaidon/image/7_567-table-type-soy-sauce-.jpg
(Soy sauce / Image)

Soy sauce (also called soya sauce) is a condiment produced by fermenting soybeans with Aspergillus oryzae or Aspergillus soyae molds, along with water and salt. After the fermentation, which yields moromi, the moromi is pressed, and two substances are obtained: a liquid, which is the soy sauce, and a cake of (wheat and) soy residue, the latter being usually reused as animal feed.
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posted by jsato at 07:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2011年05月05日

Sukiyabashi Jiro

Japan Sukiyabashi Jiro 3-Star Sushi

Chef Jiro Ono has been recognized by the Japanese government as a national treasure and “modern master” for his contributions to Japanese cuisine. He has received three Michelin stars. The awards an accolades for this masterful chef are endless. And to believe he is over 80 years old.
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posted by jsato at 08:22| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2011年04月10日

Local cuisine of the Kanto region

Yuba or bean curd layer (Tochigi Prefecture)

When soy milk is boiled, a thin layer forms on the surface. Yuba is made by gently scooping off this layer. It first came from China along with tofu and has since developed as part of the Japanese food culture. Yuba can be dried and wrapped around fillings, or it can be added to stews and cooked dishes, or even eaten with soy sauce and grated wasabi (Japanese horseradish), just like sashimi. These days, yuba is regarded as a highly nutritious food with the added benefit of being easy to cook. Along with Nikko (Tochigi), Kyoto is also famous for producing yuba. In historical cities like these, yuba dishes have been popular for generations and long-established yuba restaurants remain extremely busy. How about giving this traditional taste a try?
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posted by jsato at 18:18| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2011年04月04日

Soy sauce / History & etc. / Japanese Cuisine

Soy sauce (also called soya sauce) is a condiment produced by fermenting soybeans with Aspergillus oryzae or Aspergillus soyae molds, along with water and salt. After the fermentation, which yields moromi, the moromi is pressed, and two substances are obtained: a liquid, which is the soy sauce, and a cake of (wheat and) soy residue, the latter being usually reused as animal feed.
Read more
posted by jsato at 07:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年12月31日

Japanese Dishes Vol. 1

Refer to overview of popular Japanese dishes.
We have many Japanese Dishes. You might be able to enjoy Japanese Dishes when you will have a chance to visit Japan.
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タグ:Japanese Dishes
posted by jsato at 07:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年12月30日

Popular Dishes

Japanese cuisine offers a great variety of dishes and regional specialties. Some of the most popular Japanese and Japanized dishes are listed below.
We have categorized them into rice dishes, seafood dishes, noodle dishes, nabe dishes, soya bean dishes, yoshoku dishes and other dishes. Please note that some dishes may fit into multiple categories, but are listed only once.Read more
posted by jsato at 10:05| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年11月04日

The real deal--homemade miso soup / JAPANESE HOME COOKING

DASHI stock derived from niboshi will greatly enhance the flavor of your usual miso soup and cooked dishes. Cooking expert Tatsuo Saito says, "It is nice to have your standard dashi that fits you like your favorite underwear."
Niboshi, called iriko in western Japan, are made by boiling baby sardines and drying them. Make sure you buy good quality sardines and avoid those whose middle part has turned yellow, says Saito. Place in the freezer for long-term storage.
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posted by jsato at 08:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年10月22日

OHITASHI /JAPANESE HOME COOKING

OHITASHI is a simple fare of boiled greens and dashi dressing served as a side dish.
Tatsuo Saito, an expert on Japanese cuisine, says the key is to "boil quickly and cool swiftly," using the most appropriate method for each vegetable.
For greens the leaves are usually boiled with a pinch of salt and then quickly immersed in cold water to remove the harsh taste and prevent loss of color.
With spring cabbage, though, adding salt and placing in water would only take away taste and nutrients.
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posted by jsato at 08:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年09月30日

Sake Drinkers' Food (2) / Japanese Food

Certain foods are strongly associated with drinking and are often known as otsumami. This is an honorific formed from the verb tsumamu, to pick something up by the fingertips (or chopsticks).
Another expression for food specifically intended as an accompaniment to sake is sakana. Below are a few of the bits and pieces to be found at the elbow of drinkers in Japan - sakana every sake fan should try at least once.
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タグ:Japanese food
posted by jsato at 08:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年09月29日

Sake Drinkers' Food / Japanese Food

Certain foods are strongly associated with drinking and are often known as otsumami.
This is an honorific formed from the verb tsumamu, to pick something up by the fingertips (or chopsticks). Another expression for food specifically intended as an accompaniment to sake is sakana.
Below are a few of the bits and pieces to be found at the elbow of drinkers in Japan - sakana every sake fan should try at least once.
Read more
posted by jsato at 08:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年09月13日

Japanese Cuisine / Kamakura and Modern Era

Refer to "Japanese Cuisine" in Kamakura Period around 12 centuries. 
The Kamakura period marked a large political change in Japan. Prior to the Kamakura period, the samurai were guards of the landed estates of the nobility.Continued
posted by jsato at 08:00| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

2010年09月12日

Sushi Comes to Washington / Japanese Food & Cooking

Food Standards Agency Issues Seaweed Warning
Food Safety News - ‎Aug 6, 2010

Hijiki is a very dark, shredded type of seaweed traditionally eaten as an appetizer in Japanese cuisine. It is not used in sushi or Chinese restaurants. ...
Continued
タグ:gourmet
posted by jsato at 12:50| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

Japanese Cuisine / Ancient era-Heian Period History

Refer to the history in relation to "Japanese Cuisine".
"Jaoanese Cuisine in Ancient era and Heian Period" is as follows.
Following the
Jōmon period, Japanese society shifted from semi-sedentary hunter-gatherer lifestyle to an agricultural society.

Continued
posted by jsato at 08:46| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

Japanese Cuisine

Refer to Japanese Cuisine.
Japanese cuisine has developed over the centuries as a result of many political and social changes. The cuisine eventually changed with the advent of the Medieval age which ushered in a shedding of elitism with the age of shogun rule.

Continued
posted by jsato at 08:20| Comment(0) | Japanese Cuisine | このブログの読者になる | 更新情報をチェックする

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